Due to the emerging COVID-19 pandemic, JGI will not be accepting or processing any samples because of reduced onsite staffing until further notice.
Home • Blakeslea trispora F986 v1.0
Upper panel. Wild type strains of opposite mating type (F921, mating type -, and F986, mating type +) growing together show increased accumulation of the orange pigment beta-carotene as a result of sexual interactions. Lower panel. The wild type strain F986 (mating type +) interacts sexually with a beta-carotene overproducer strain SB64 (mating type -). Notice the increase in beta-carotene accumulation and the development of sexual structures along the interaction strip. Images by Lola P. Camino.
Upper panel. Wild type strains of opposite mating type (F921, mating type -, and F986, mating type +) growing together show increased accumulation of the orange pigment beta-carotene as a result of sexual interactions. Lower panel. The wild type strain F986 (mating type +) interacts sexually with a beta-carotene overproducer strain SB64 (mating type -). Notice the increase in beta-carotene accumulation and the development of sexual structures along the interaction strip. Images by Lola P. Camino.

Blakeslea trispora is a zygomycete fungus classified in the family Choanephoraceae [Order Mucorales]. It is isolated from soils in subtropical and tropical regions of the world and is reported as a pathogen of multiple plants species. Like many zygomycete fungi, B. trispora produces beta-carotene during sexual reproduction and after exposure to light. B. trispora is used in industrial production of beta-carotene as a dietary supplement in food production.  Sequencing of B. trispora will advance the 1000 Fungal Genome Project by providing representative genomes for Choanephoraceae, an important family of “zygomycetes” and additional insight into the evolution of carotenoid biosynthesis by early diverging fungi.