Home • Massarina eburnea CBS 473.64 v1.0
Vertical section through ascoma.
Vertical section through ascoma.
Image Credit: Pedro Crous
Asci and ascospores.
Asci and ascospores.
Image Credit: Pedro Crous

Massarina is a genus of fungi in the family Massarinaceae (Dothideomycetes). Dothideomycetes is the largest and most diverse class of ascomycete fungi. It comprises 11 orders 90 families, 1300 genera and over 19,000 known species.

Massarina was proposed by Saccardo (1883) for species of pyrenocarpous ascomycetes with hyaline ascospores that had previously been placed in Massaria De Not. In Massarina, the ascospores are 2-celled or multi septate and are almost always surrounded by a simple, thin, mucilaginous sheath. Athough hyaline at maturity in some species, spores may become brown with age. Asci are bitunicate, having fissitunicate dehiscence and are provided with an ocular chamber and faint apical ring. The neck in M. eburnea is surrounded by a clypeus, comprising compact brown-walled angular to globose fungal cells. Fungi with Massarina-like characteristics have been identified from wood submerged in marine and freshwater environments and on decaying palm fronds.
This genome was sequenced as part of the 1000 Fungal Genomes Project.