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Home • Talaromyces aculeatus ATCC 10409 v1.0
Talaromyces aculeatus by Keith Seifert.
Talaromyces aculeatus by Keith Seifert.

Talaromyces aculeatus

Talaromyces species are moulds found commonly associated with soil and decaying organic matter. They are members of the Eurotiales in the Ascomycota, characterized by fruiting bodies of loosely interwoven hyphae with spherical asci each containing eight ascospores. Talaromyces is closely related to Penicillium and the asexual stage of Talaromyces is difficult to distinguish from Penicillium. They are known for biodeterioration of organic matter, and production of antibiotics and toxic metabolites (mycotoxins). One Talaromyces species, T. marneffei, is an important human pathogen. Some Penicillium and Talaromyces species can also release fixed phosphorus (P) in the soil and make it available to growing plants. Compared with other nutrients, P is the least mobile and available to plants in most soils. P-solubilizing fungi play an important role in the global P cycle and can supply P to plants in an environmentally friendly and sustainable manner. This particular T. aculeatus strain (ATCC 10409) was isolated from textiles and characterized with respect to its extracellular dextranase production by Lever Brothers Ltd. (now Unilever). Some other T. aculeatus strains grow as endophytes inside of plant hosts. T. aculeatus is a strong iron phosphate solubilizer. The T. aculeatus genome will help to unravel mechanisms of P solubilization and fungal contributions to the P cycle.