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Home • Sporothrix schenckii 1099-18
Conidiophores and conidia of the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.
Conidiophores and conidia of the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Image Credit: CDC/Dr. Libero Ajello Creation Date: 1972
From http://phil.cdc.gov/phil_images/20030721/16/PHIL_4208_lores.jpg via Wikimedia Commons. This image is a work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, taken or made as part of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.
Sporothrix schenckii growing on Sabouraud's dextrose agar plate.
Sporothrix schenckii growing on Sabouraud's dextrose agar plate. Image Credit: CDC/Dr. Lucille K. Georg
From http://phil.cdc.gov/phil_images/20030611/4/PHIL_3943_lores.jpg via Wikimedia Commons. This image is a work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, taken or made as part of an employee's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

The Sporothrix schenckii 1099-18 genome sequence and gene models were not determined by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) but were downloaded from Ensembl Fungi on Apr 11, 2020. Please note that this copy of the genome is not maintained by Ensembl and is therefore not automatically updated. In order to allow comparative analyses with other fungal genomes sequenced by the JGI, a copy of this genome is incorporated into MycoCosm. The JGI Annotation Pipeline was used to add the functional annotation to this genome.

Sporothrix schenckii is found in soil and on living and decomposing plant material such as peat moss worldwide. It can infect humans as well as animals causing sporotrichosis, commonly known as "rose handler's disease." The most common route of infection is the introduction of spores to the body through a cut or puncture wound in the skin. Infection commonly occurs in otherwise healthy individuals but is rarely life-threatening and can be treated with antifungals. When in the environment or grown in the laboratory at 25 °C (77 °F) it is found growing as filamentous hyphae. At 37 °C (99 °F) either in the laboratory or in host tissue, it assumes its yeast form. The transition between the hyphal and yeast forms is temperature dependent making S. schenckii a thermally dimorphic fungus.

Genome Reference(s)